Episode 53: Personality Blueprint Part 4- The Enneagram

Today we dive into an overview of the enneagram and how it can help you understand yourself.

This particular framework is one of the most complicated to explain and understand. BUT it also has some amazing payoffs when you do.

Listen in if you are new to the enneagram, or if you are familiar but want to learn a few new things (I did myself prepping for this episode!)

A few things we cover:

Overview of Enneagram

Type summaries:

Type One is principled, purposeful, self-controlled, and perfectionistic.

Type Two is generous, demonstrative, people-pleasing, and possessive.

Type Three is adaptable, excelling, driven, and image-conscious.

Type Four is expressive, dramatic, self-absorbed, and temperamental.

Type Five is perceptive, innovative, secretive, and isolated.

Type Six is engaging, responsible, anxious, and suspicious.

Type Seven is spontaneous, versatile, acquisitive, and scattered.

Type Eight is self-confident, decisive, willful, and confrontational.

Type Nine is receptive, reassuring, complacent, and resigned.

The Centers- each type is focused on assets and liabilities within their center

8,9,1 Instinctive center, dominant emotion is anger

2,3,4 Feeling center, dominant emotion is shame

5,6,7 Thinking center, dominant emotion is fear

The Wing

Your basic type dominates your overall personality, while the wing complements it and adds important, sometimes contradictory, elements to your total personality. Most enneagram experts agree that you have a dominant wing, but it is possible to have no wing or to have both wings show up equally in your personality.

The Levels of Development

Healthy, Average, Unhealthy- three levels in each section

a measure of our capacity to be present.

Directions of Integration (Growth) and Disintegration (Stress)

The inner lines of the Enneagram connect the types in a sequence that denotes what each type will do under different conditions. There are two lines connected to each type, and they connect with two other types. One line connects with a type that represents how a person of the first type behaves when they are moving toward health and growth. This is called the Direction of Integration or Growth. The other line goes to another type that represents how the person is likely to act out if they are under increased stress and pressure—when they feel they are not in control of the situation. This second line is called the Direction of Stress or Disintegration. In other words, different situations will evoke different kinds of responses from your personality. You will respond or adapt in different directions, as indicated by the lines of the Enneagram from your basic type.

The Three Instincts

We each have a self-preservation instinct (for preserving the body and its life and functioning), a sexual instinct (for extending ourselves in the environment and through the generations), and a social instinct (for getting along with others and forming secure social bonds).

Self-Preservation types are concerned with having enough resources to meet life’s demands. Tend to be more grounded, practical, serious, and introverted

Sexual types have an intense drive for stimulation and a constant awareness of the “chemistry” or energy between themselves and others. Tend to be more aggressive, competitive, charged, and emotionally intense

Social types are highly aware of other people and their impact on them. They tend to be warmer, more open, engaging, and socially responsible.

Summary: Ultimately, the goal is for each of us to “move around” the Enneagram, integrating what each type symbolizes and acquiring the healthy potentials of all the types. The ideal is to become a balanced, fully functioning person who can draw on the power (or from the Latin, “virtue”) of each as needed. Each of the types of the Enneagram symbolizes different important aspects of what we need to achieve this end. The personality type we begin life with is therefore less important ultimately than how well (or badly) we use our type as the beginning point for our self-development and self-realization.

Helpful Links:
https://www.truity.com/enneagram/what-is-enneagram
https://www.enneagraminstitute.com/how-the-enneagram-system-works
Free tests:
https://www.truity.com/test/enneagram-personality-test
https://www.crystalknows.com/enneagram-test
Podcasts: (I especially recommend the first one with Ian Cron.)
https://enneagramgift.com/enneagram-podcasts/

Schedule a free session to partner with me to understand yourself better.
Denita

Episode 50: Personality Blueprint Part 1, Gretchen Rubin’s 4 Tendencies

I have always been a personality geek– at least since being an adult and taking psychology classes in college. So it was surprising to me when I realized that not everyone is into these frameworks, and many people who are interested in learning more about themselves have never taken the time to delve into them.

This started out as simply something that sounded fun to me. What if I walked someone else through some of the personality frameworks I have learned about, and that have helped me?

So I offered it to a couple of my past clients. These are ladies I worked with for a full year and still have a friendship with. I thought it would be fun and useful to them as well. It was just an experiment, so I offered as a free service.

Their impressions blew me away. They both told me how much it has helped them and changed the way they think of themselves. Even after an entire year of coaching with me!

And I started seeing how it could have really supported my coaching with them, if I had known these details from the beginning. Basically, it would help me understand how to approach coaching, and have a better context of what might be worth doing the mindset work around, and what might not.

I call it the Personality Blueprint. And it helps you learn about how you are wired by default. (This is totally up for debate, as personality is shaped by life experiences too.)

We dive into 6 personality tools to help us better understand ourselves:

  1. Gretchen Rubin’s 4 Tendencies (that’s what I discuss in today’s episode)
  2. Meyer’s Briggs Type Indicator
  3. Enneagram
  4. Top 5 CliftonStrengths
  5. Values Discovery
  6. Find Your Why Exercise (by Simon Sinek)

We use what we learn to create a blueprint for you navigating real life; a way for you to “stack your circumstances” as much as possible to make life easier and more joyful for yourself.

In Part 1, I explain Gretchen Rubin’s 4 Tendencies framework. Some links you may want to explore:

You can take the quiz here: https://quiz.gretchenrubin.com
The Venn diagram is here: https://images.app.goo.gl/vZy6GQ2HCa719px9A
Upholder explained: https://quiz.gretchenrubin.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/3/2018/08/Upholder-Report.pdf
Obliger explained: https://quiz.gretchenrubin.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/3/2018/08/Obliger-Report.pdf
Rebel explained: https://quiz.gretchenrubin.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/3/2021/06/Rebel-Report.pdf
Questioner explained: https://quiz.gretchenrubin.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/3/2018/08/Questioner-Report.pdf

I would love to know: have you heard about the 4 tendencies before? Do you find them useful? What tendency are you? Do you have any questions? Feel free to connect with me on Instagram or set up a free session to talk about your results and how you can use them in your life! Coming in 2022 will be an 8-week Personality Blueprint coaching package. Stay tuned if that is interesting to you.

Enjoy!
Denita